Singapore Blue - Lampropelma violaceopes 
Maybe you do not like spiders much, but certainly this tarantula commonly known as Singapore Blue and scientifically as Lampropelma violaceopes (Theraphosidae) is awesome and … beautiful.
The females of this species are the most attractive because of its brilliant metallic blue colors, only apparent in good light. The abdomen has the same blue tint with singular red longish bristles and a “Tiger like” pattern edged in black radiating from the dorsal center down the sides of the abdomen. 
Sexual dimorphism applies, and males turn a monotone olive green after the ultimate molt. Slender legs and smallish abdomen of the male gives it a “ghostlike” appearance. Not really a pretty spider to look at, almost fluffy with bristles.
These tarantulas can grow up to 23 cm across. In the wild they occur in Malaysia and Singapore.
References: [1]
Photo credit: ©Jay Tougas | Locality: captive (2010)

Singapore Blue - Lampropelma violaceopes 

Maybe you do not like spiders much, but certainly this tarantula commonly known as Singapore Blue and scientifically as Lampropelma violaceopes (Theraphosidae) is awesome and … beautiful.

The females of this species are the most attractive because of its brilliant metallic blue colors, only apparent in good light. The abdomen has the same blue tint with singular red longish bristles and a “Tiger like” pattern edged in black radiating from the dorsal center down the sides of the abdomen. 

Sexual dimorphism applies, and males turn a monotone olive green after the ultimate molt. Slender legs and smallish abdomen of the male gives it a “ghostlike” appearance. Not really a pretty spider to look at, almost fluffy with bristles.

These tarantulas can grow up to 23 cm across. In the wild they occur in Malaysia and Singapore.

References: [1]

Photo credit: ©Jay Tougas | Locality: captive (2010)

Glenn Greenwald: Why privacy matters

Glenn Greenwald was one of the first reporters to see — and write about — the Edward Snowden files, with their revelations about the United States’ extensive surveillance of private citizens. In this searing talk, Greenwald makes the case for why you need to care about privacy, even if you’re “not doing anything you need to hide.”

Calgary Zoo tiger matriarch dies of old age
With only about 350 Amur tigers in the wild and approximately 500 in captivity, Kita was key in furthering a breeding program due to her genetic profile, the zoo said. She created “a legacy” of 21 descendants — about four per cent of the total captive population.
“Amur tigers are declining and they are managed by a species survival program. Their genetics are matched with all kinds of different tigers throughout North America,” Baird said. “Kita did that. She came from Toronto, bred successfully and had successful offspring.”
Baird said Kita arrived in Calgary from the Toronto Zoo in 1999.
The “feisty feline” quickly endeared herself to zoo keepers and visitors alike, instantly recognizable by her stature and playfulness.
A year after her arrival, Kita and Khasam had five healthy cubs — Marilei, Tsamara, Fedor Eh, and Katja. In 2007, she bore another cub, Vitali, with Lashka.
The zoo said in total, Kita gave the Amur tiger population five cubs, eight grandchildren, five great-grandchildren, and three great-great-grandchildren, who have moved across North America and Europe.

Calgary Zoo tiger matriarch dies of old age

With only about 350 Amur tigers in the wild and approximately 500 in captivity, Kita was key in furthering a breeding program due to her genetic profile, the zoo said. She created “a legacy” of 21 descendants — about four per cent of the total captive population.

“Amur tigers are declining and they are managed by a species survival program. Their genetics are matched with all kinds of different tigers throughout North America,” Baird said. “Kita did that. She came from Toronto, bred successfully and had successful offspring.”

Baird said Kita arrived in Calgary from the Toronto Zoo in 1999.

The “feisty feline” quickly endeared herself to zoo keepers and visitors alike, instantly recognizable by her stature and playfulness.

A year after her arrival, Kita and Khasam had five healthy cubs — Marilei, Tsamara, Fedor Eh, and Katja. In 2007, she bore another cub, Vitali, with Lashka.

The zoo said in total, Kita gave the Amur tiger population five cubs, eight grandchildren, five great-grandchildren, and three great-great-grandchildren, who have moved across North America and Europe.

Hyloscirtus condor - A new frog species described for Ecuador 

An assessment of the herpetofauna in the southern part of Cordillera del Condor, province of Zamora Chinchipe, Ecuador, led to the discovery of a new species of tree frog of the genus Hyloscirtus (Hylidae), a group little known because of their elusive habits, and their distribution restricted to unexplored places.

The new species, described just this year (2014), was named Hyloscirtus condor alluding to the Cordillera del Condor where these frogs were found. This name is intended to highlight the biological importance of this mountain range.

Hyloscirtus condor has a unique dorsal color pattern that distinguishes it from other species of the group. The back is dark cinnamon brown with yellow spots, extending to the flanks and limbs. Other distinctive features are the golden iris with fine reticulations, horizontal black pupil, hypertrophied arms and fingers and feet with skin ridges.

The images shown are of the holotype of the species.

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©J. Brito - Secretaría Educación Superior Ecuador | Locality: Ecuador (2012) | [Top] - [Bottom]

rhamphotheca
rhamphotheca:

In the Shadows of Machu Picchu, Scientists Find ‘Extinct’ Cat-Sized Rodent
by Jeremy Hance
Below one of the most famous archaeological sites in the world, scientists have made a remarkable discovery: a living cat-sized mammal that, until now, was only known from fossils.
The Machu Picchu arboreal chinchilla rat (Cuscomys oblativa) was first described from two enigmatic skulls discovered in Incan pottery sculpted 400 years ago. Dug up by Hiram Bignham in 1912, the skulls were believed to belong to a species that went extinct even before Francisco Pizarro showed up in Peru with his motley army.
Yet, all that changed in 2009 when a park ranger, Roberto Quispe, found what was believed to be a living Machu Picchu arboreal chinchilla rat near the original archaeological site.”In Conservation Biology this type of rediscoveries is called the Lazarus effect,” writes a team of Mexican and Peruvian scientists in a press release, who years later sought to confirm Quispe’s discovery…
(read more: MongaBay)
photograph by Roberto Quispe

rhamphotheca:

In the Shadows of Machu Picchu, Scientists Find ‘Extinct’ Cat-Sized Rodent

by Jeremy Hance

Below one of the most famous archaeological sites in the world, scientists have made a remarkable discovery: a living cat-sized mammal that, until now, was only known from fossils.

The Machu Picchu arboreal chinchilla rat (Cuscomys oblativa) was first described from two enigmatic skulls discovered in Incan pottery sculpted 400 years ago. Dug up by Hiram Bignham in 1912, the skulls were believed to belong to a species that went extinct even before Francisco Pizarro showed up in Peru with his motley army.

Yet, all that changed in 2009 when a park ranger, Roberto Quispe, found what was believed to be a living Machu Picchu arboreal chinchilla rat near the original archaeological site.”In Conservation Biology this type of rediscoveries is called the Lazarus effect,” writes a team of Mexican and Peruvian scientists in a press release, who years later sought to confirm Quispe’s discovery…

(read more: MongaBay)

photograph by Roberto Quispe

ovarytissue
biodiverseed:

science-junkie:

How Information Theory Could Hold the Key to Quantifying Nature
John Harte, a professor of ecology at the University of California, Berkeley, has developed what he calls the maximum entropy (MaxEnt) theory of ecology, which may offer a solution to a long-standing problem in ecology: how to calculate the total number of species in an ecosystem, as well as other important numbers, based on extremely limited information — which is all that ecologists, no matter how many years they spend in the field, ever have. […] He and his colleagues will soon publish the results of a study that estimates the number of insect and tree species living in a tropical forest in Panama. The paper will also suggest how MaxEnt could give species estimates in the Amazon, a swath of more than 2 million square miles of land that is notoriously difficult to survey.If the MaxEnt theory of ecology can give good estimates in a wide variety of scenarios, it could help answer the many questions that revolve around how species are spread across the landscape, such as how many would be lost if a forest were cleared, how to design wildlife preserves that keep species intact, or how many rarely seen species might be hiding in a given area. Perhaps more importantly, the theory hints at a unified way of thinking about ecology — as a system that can be described with just a few variables, with all the complexity of life built on top.
Read the article @WIRED

#science #math #biodiversity

biodiverseed:

science-junkie:

How Information Theory Could Hold the Key to Quantifying Nature

John Harte, a professor of ecology at the University of California, Berkeley, has developed what he calls the maximum entropy (MaxEnt) theory of ecology, which may offer a solution to a long-standing problem in ecology: how to calculate the total number of species in an ecosystem, as well as other important numbers, based on extremely limited information — which is all that ecologists, no matter how many years they spend in the field, ever have. […] He and his colleagues will soon publish the results of a study that estimates the number of insect and tree species living in a tropical forest in Panama. The paper will also suggest how MaxEnt could give species estimates in the Amazon, a swath of more than 2 million square miles of land that is notoriously difficult to survey.

If the MaxEnt theory of ecology can give good estimates in a wide variety of scenarios, it could help answer the many questions that revolve around how species are spread across the landscape, such as how many would be lost if a forest were cleared, how to design wildlife preserves that keep species intact, or how many rarely seen species might be hiding in a given area. Perhaps more importantly, the theory hints at a unified way of thinking about ecology — as a system that can be described with just a few variables, with all the complexity of life built on top.

Read the article @WIRED

#science #math #biodiversity

whateveramusesme

whateveramusesme:

Preserving Lonesome George

Museum scientists and a master taxidermist describe the painstaking process—part art, part science—of preserving Lonesome George, the famous Pinta Island tortoise who died in 2012 in the Galapagos Islands. As the last known survivor of the tortoise species Chelonoidis abingdoni, Lonesome George served as a global icon of conservation—and a reminder of the urgent need to address ever-increasing extinctions. After a limited time on view at the Museum Lonesome George returns to Ecuador as part of that nation’s patrimony.

son-pereda
afp-photo:


ICELAND, Vatnajoekull : An aerial picture taken on September 14, 2014 shows lava flowing out of the Bardarbunga volcano in southeast Iceland. The Bardarbunga volcano system has been rocked by hundreds of tremors daily since mid-August, prompting fears the volcano could explode. Bardarbunga, at 2,000 metres (6,500 feet), is Iceland’s second-highest peak and is located under Europe’s largest glacier, Vatnajoekull. AFP PHOTO / BERNARD MERIC

afp-photo:

ICELAND, Vatnajoekull : An aerial picture taken on September 14, 2014 shows lava flowing out of the Bardarbunga volcano in southeast Iceland. The Bardarbunga volcano system has been rocked by hundreds of tremors daily since mid-August, prompting fears the volcano could explode. Bardarbunga, at 2,000 metres (6,500 feet), is Iceland’s second-highest peak and is located under Europe’s largest glacier, Vatnajoekull. AFP PHOTO / BERNARD MERIC

togivelifeameaning

togivelifeameaning:

So a friend and I went to this palm oil fundraiser on Saturday but it turned out that it was pretty much a mansion full of airhead barbies and kens. To make world saving appear like a cool thing to this demographic, we came up with this idea…check it out!