son-pereda
afp-photo:


ICELAND, Vatnajoekull : An aerial picture taken on September 14, 2014 shows lava flowing out of the Bardarbunga volcano in southeast Iceland. The Bardarbunga volcano system has been rocked by hundreds of tremors daily since mid-August, prompting fears the volcano could explode. Bardarbunga, at 2,000 metres (6,500 feet), is Iceland’s second-highest peak and is located under Europe’s largest glacier, Vatnajoekull. AFP PHOTO / BERNARD MERIC

afp-photo:

ICELAND, Vatnajoekull : An aerial picture taken on September 14, 2014 shows lava flowing out of the Bardarbunga volcano in southeast Iceland. The Bardarbunga volcano system has been rocked by hundreds of tremors daily since mid-August, prompting fears the volcano could explode. Bardarbunga, at 2,000 metres (6,500 feet), is Iceland’s second-highest peak and is located under Europe’s largest glacier, Vatnajoekull. AFP PHOTO / BERNARD MERIC

togivelifeameaning

togivelifeameaning:

So a friend and I went to this palm oil fundraiser on Saturday but it turned out that it was pretty much a mansion full of airhead barbies and kens. To make world saving appear like a cool thing to this demographic, we came up with this idea…check it out!

lionexx
pdpete:

Laughing Owl
The Laughing Owl (Sceloglaux albifacies), also known as Whēkau or the White-faced Owl, was an endemic owl found in New Zealand in 1840, but is now extinct. It was plentiful when European settlers arrived in New Zealand. Specimens were sent to the British Museum, where a scientific description was published in 1845. The species belongs to the monotypic genus Sceloglaux (“scoundrel owl”, probably because of the mischievous-sounding calls).

pdpete:

Laughing Owl

The Laughing Owl (Sceloglaux albifacies), also known as Whēkau or the White-faced Owl, was an endemic owl found in New Zealand in 1840, but is now extinct. It was plentiful when European settlers arrived in New Zealand. Specimens were sent to the British Museum, where a scientific description was published in 1845. The species belongs to the monotypic genus Sceloglaux (“scoundrel owl”, probably because of the mischievous-sounding calls).

whateveramusesme
whateveramusesme:

Mole Cricket (Gryllotalpida) by Procyrous
Mole crickets are cylindrical-bodied insects, with small eyes and shovel-like forelimbs highly developed for burrowing. The hind legs are shaped somewhat like the legs of a real cricket, but are more adapted for shoving while digging, rather than leaping, which they do rarely and poorly. (more)

whateveramusesme:

Mole Cricket (Gryllotalpida) by Procyrous

Mole crickets are cylindrical-bodied insects, with small eyes and shovel-like forelimbs highly developed for burrowing. The hind legs are shaped somewhat like the legs of a real cricket, but are more adapted for shoving while digging, rather than leaping, which they do rarely and poorly. (more)

Deep sea ‘mushroom’ may be new branch of life

A mushroom-shaped sea animal discovered off the Australian coast has defied classification in the tree of life.

A team of scientists at the University of Copenhagen says the tiny organism does not fit into any of the known subdivisions of the animal kingdom.

Such a situation has occurred only a handful of times in the last 100 years.

The organisms, which were originally collected in 1986, are described in the academic journal Plos One.

"Finding something like this is extremely rare, it’s maybe only happened about four times in the last 100 years," said co-author Jorgen Olesen from the University of Copenhagen.

He told BBC News: “We think it belongs in the animal kingdom somewhere; the question is where.”

The new organisms are multicellular but mostly non-symmetrical, with a dense layer of gelatinous material between the outer skin cell and inner stomach cell layers. (more)

Puget Sound’s orca population falling, census finds
With two new deaths this year and no new calves since 2012, the population of endangered killer whales in the Puget Sound continues to decline.
The number of whales in J, K and L pods has dropped to 78, a level not seen since 1985, according to a census by the Center for Whale Research. Adding to the concerns, the whales appear to be “splintering” from their pods, which are their basic social groups.
Since 1976, Ken Balcomb of the research center has been observing the Puget Sound orcas, or Southern Residents as they’re known among scientists. Balcomb compiles an annual census of the population for submission to the federal government.
Balcomb suggests that the primary factor for the population decline is a lack of food for the killer whales, which generally prey on chinook salmon passing through the San Juan Islands on the way back to Canada’s Fraser River. The whales have a strong preference for chinook, typically larger and fatter fish, but they will eat other species of salmon and even other fish sometimes.
"The salmon issue is huge, and it is ongoing," Balcomb said.
Chinook runs continue to decline in most areas, and state and federal salmon managers seem unable to turn the situation around, he said. Society’s dependence on hatcheries, harvest and hydropower have diluted the wild salmon populations and made long-term recovery increasingly difficult.

Puget Sound’s orca population falling, census finds

With two new deaths this year and no new calves since 2012, the population of endangered killer whales in the Puget Sound continues to decline.

The number of whales in J, K and L pods has dropped to 78, a level not seen since 1985, according to a census by the Center for Whale Research. Adding to the concerns, the whales appear to be “splintering” from their pods, which are their basic social groups.

Since 1976, Ken Balcomb of the research center has been observing the Puget Sound orcas, or Southern Residents as they’re known among scientists. Balcomb compiles an annual census of the population for submission to the federal government.

Balcomb suggests that the primary factor for the population decline is a lack of food for the killer whales, which generally prey on chinook salmon passing through the San Juan Islands on the way back to Canada’s Fraser River. The whales have a strong preference for chinook, typically larger and fatter fish, but they will eat other species of salmon and even other fish sometimes.

"The salmon issue is huge, and it is ongoing," Balcomb said.

Chinook runs continue to decline in most areas, and state and federal salmon managers seem unable to turn the situation around, he said. Society’s dependence on hatcheries, harvest and hydropower have diluted the wild salmon populations and made long-term recovery increasingly difficult.

whateveramusesme
whateveramusesme:

Asteroid smash-up captured by NASA telescope
Researchers say they believe one of NASA’s space telescopes, the Spitzer Space Telescope, has tracked an asteroid smash-up before and after the collision for the first time.
“We think two big asteroids crashed into each other, creating a huge cloud of grains the size of very fine sand, which are now smashing themselves into smithereens and slowly leaking away from the star,” said lead author Huan Meng of the University of Arizona, Tucson, in an article published Friday online in the journal Science.
While Spitzer has observed suspected asteroid smash-ups before, this marks the first time scientists have been able to collect data before and after a planetary collision. The data will help researchers understand how rocky planets, like Earth, are created.

whateveramusesme:

Asteroid smash-up captured by NASA telescope

Researchers say they believe one of NASA’s space telescopes, the Spitzer Space Telescope, has tracked an asteroid smash-up before and after the collision for the first time.

“We think two big asteroids crashed into each other, creating a huge cloud of grains the size of very fine sand, which are now smashing themselves into smithereens and slowly leaking away from the star,” said lead author Huan Meng of the University of Arizona, Tucson, in an article published Friday online in the journal Science.

While Spitzer has observed suspected asteroid smash-ups before, this marks the first time scientists have been able to collect data before and after a planetary collision. The data will help researchers understand how rocky planets, like Earth, are created.

mymodernmet

mymodernmet:

Chasing the Light by Zaria Forman

Drawings of the breathtakingly changing Arctic landscape inspired by an art expedition up the northwest coast of Greenland and meant to document the effects of climate change. “My hope is that these drawings bring awareness, and invite viewers to share the urgency in a hopeful and meaningful way. Art can facilitate a deeper understanding of any crisis, helping us find meaning and optimism in shifting landscapes.”